Financial Goals

10 Money Tips for Newly Married Couples

In a recent study, 35% of married couples described money issues as their primary source of stress. While there are many potential causes of such financial stress, in some cases the root may begin with habits formed early in the marriage.

Fortunately, couples may be able to head off many of the problems money can cause in a marriage.

Top 10 Tips For Newly Married Couples

Communication. Couples should consider talking about their financial goals, memories, and habits because each person may come into the marriage with fundamental differences in experiences and outlook that may drive their behaviors.

Set Goals. Setting goals establishes a common objective that both become committed to pursuing.

Create a Budget. A budget is an exercise for developing a spending and savings plan that is designed to reflect mutually agreed upon priorities.

Set the Foundation for Your Financial House. Identify assets and debts. Look to begin reducing debts while building your emergency fund.

Work Together. By sharing the financial decision-making, both spouses are vested in all choices, reducing the friction that can come from a single decision-maker.

Set a Minimum Threshold for Big Expenses. While possessing a level of individual spending latitude is reasonable, large expenditures should only be made with both spouses’ consent. Agree to what purchase amount should require a mutual decision.

Set Up Regular Meetings. Set aside a predetermined time every two weeks or once a month to discuss finances. Talk about your budgeting, upcoming expenses, and any changes in circumstances.

Update and Revise. As a newly married couple, you may need to update the beneficiaries on your accounts, reevaluate your insurance coverage, and revise (or create) your will.

Love, Trust, and Honesty. Approach contentious subjects with care and understanding, be honest about money decisions you know your spouse might be upset with, and trust your spouse to be responsible about handling finances.

Consider Speaking with a Financial Advisor. A financial advisor may offer insights to help you work through the critical financial decisions that all married couples face.


Click Here For a free copy of our Newlywed Checklist

Getting a Head Start on College Savings

The American family with a child born today can expect to spend about $233,610 to raise that child to the age of 18. And if you’ve already traded that supercharged convertible dream for a minivan, you can expect your little one’s college education to cost as much as $198,000.

But before you throw your hands up in the air and send junior out looking for a job, you might consider a few strategies to help you prepare for the cost of higher education.

First, take advantage of time. The time value of money is the concept that the money in your pocket today is worth more than that same amount will be worth tomorrow because it has more earning potential. If you put $100 a month toward your child’s college education, after 17 years’ time, you would have saved $20,400. But that same $100 a month would be worth over $32,000 if it had generated a hypothetical 5% annual rate of return. (The rate of return on investments will vary over time, particularly for longer-term investments. Investments that offer the potential for higher returns also carry a higher degree of risk. Actual results will fluctuate. Past performance does not guarantee future results) The bottom line is, the earlier you start, the more time you give your money to grow.

Second, don’t panic. Every parent knows the feeling – one minute you’re holding a little miracle in your arms, the next you’re trying to figure out how to pay for braces, piano lessons, and summer camp. You may feel like saving for college is a pipe dream. But remember, many people get some sort of help in the form of financial aid and scholarships. Although it’s difficult to forecast how much help you may get in aid and scholarships, they can provide a valuable supplement to what you have already saved.

Finally, weigh your options. There are a number of federal and state-sponsored, tax-advantaged college savings programs available. Some offer prepaid tuition plans and others offer tax-deferred savings. (The tax implications of education savings programs can vary significantly from state to state, and some plans may provide advantages and benefits exclusively for their residents. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. Withdrawals from tax-advantaged education savings programs that are not used for education are subject to ordinary income taxes and may be subject to penalties.) Many such plans are state sponsored, so the details will vary from one state to the next. A number of private colleges and universities now also offer prepaid tuition plans for their institutions. It pays to do your homework to find the vehicle that may work best for you. Click here to visit a past blog article to learn more about Saving with 529 Plans.

As a parent, you teach your children to dream big and believe in their ability to overcome any obstacle. By investing wisely, you can help tackle the financial obstacles of higher education for them – and smooth the way for them to pursue their dreams.

8 Mistakes That Can Upend Your Retirement

Pursuing your retirement dreams is challenging enough without making some common, and very avoidable, mistakes. Here are eight big mistakes to steer clear of, if possible.

No Strategy. Yes, the biggest mistake is having no strategy at all. Without a strategy, you may have no goals, leaving you no way of knowing how you’ll get there – and if you’ve even arrived. Creating a strategy may increase your potential for success, both before and after retirement.

Frequent Trading. Chasing “hot” investments often leads to despair. Create an asset allocation strategy that is properly diversified to reflect your objectives, risk tolerance, and time horizon; then, make adjustments based on changes in your personal situation, not due to market ups and downs.

Not Maximizing Tax-Deferred Savings. Workers have tax-advantaged ways to save for retirement. Not participating in your workplace retirement plan may be a mistake, especially when you’re passing up free money in the form of employer-matching contributions.

Prioritizing College Funding over Retirement. Your kids’ college education is important, but you may not want to sacrifice your retirement for it. Remember, you can get loans and grants for college, but you can’t for your retirement.

Overlooking Health Care Costs. Extended care may be an expense that can undermine your financial strategy for retirement if you don’t prepare for it.

Not Adjusting Your Investment Approach Well Before Retirement. The last thing your retirement portfolio can afford is a sharp fall in stock prices and a sustained bear market at the moment you’re ready to stop working. Consider adjusting your asset allocation in advance of tapping your savings so you’re not selling stocks when prices are depressed.

The return and principal value of stock prices will fluctuate as market conditions change. And shares, when sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Asset allocation and diversification are approaches to help manage investment risk. Asset allocation and diversification do not guarantee against investment loss. Past performance does not guarantee future results.

Retiring with Too Much Debt. If too much debt is bad when you’re making money, it can be especially harmful when you’re living in retirement. Consider managing or reducing your debt level before you retire.

It’s Not Only About Money. Above all, a rewarding retirement requires good health. So, maintain a healthy diet, exercise regularly, stay socially involved, and remain intellectually active.

Merging Your Money When You Marry

If you’re newly engaged or just tied the knot – Congratulations! Getting married is exciting, but it can also come with several challenges. One challenge that you and your spouse will have to face is how to merge your finances. Planning carefully and communicating clearly are important, because the financial decisions that you make now can have a lasting impact on your future.

Discuss your financial goals

The first step in mapping out your financial future together is to discuss your financial goals. Start by making a list of your short-term goals (e.g., paying off wedding debt, new car, vacation) and long-term goals (e.g., having children, your children's college education, retirement). Then, determine which goals are most important to you. Once you've identified the goals that are a priority, you can focus your energy on achieving them.

Prepare a budget

Next, you should prepare a budget that lists all of your income and expenses over a certain time period (e.g., monthly, annually). You can designate one spouse to be in charge of managing the budget, or you can take turns keeping records and paying the bills. If both you and your spouse are going to be involved, make sure that you develop a record-keeping system that both of you understand. And remember to keep your records in a joint filing system so that both of you can easily locate important documents.

Begin by listing your sources of income (e.g., salaries and wages, interest, dividends). Then, list your expenses (it may be helpful to review several months of entries in your checkbook and credit card bills). Add them up and compare the two totals. Hopefully, you get a positive number, meaning that you spend less than you earn. If not, review your expenses and see where you can cut down on your spending.

Bank accounts--separate or joint?

At some point, you and your spouse will have to decide whether to combine your bank accounts or keep them separate. Maintaining a joint account does have advantages, such as easier record keeping and lower maintenance fees. However, it's sometimes more difficult to keep track of how much money is in a joint account when two individuals have access to it. Of course, you could avoid this problem by making sure that you tell each other every time you write a check or withdraw funds from the account. Or, you could always decide to maintain separate accounts.

Credit cards

If you're thinking about adding your name to your spouse's credit card accounts, think again. When you and your spouse have joint credit, both of you will become responsible for 100 percent of the credit card debt. In addition, if one of you has poor credit, it will negatively impact the credit rating of the other.

If you or your spouse does not qualify for a card because of poor credit, and you are willing to give your spouse account privileges anyway, you can make your spouse an authorized user of your credit card. An authorized user is not a joint cardholder and is therefore not liable for any amounts charged to the account. Also, the account activity won't show up on the authorized user's credit record. But remember, you remain responsible for the account.

Insurance

If you and your spouse have separate health insurance coverage, you'll want to do a cost/benefit analysis of each plan to see if you should continue to keep your health coverage separate. For example, if your spouse's health plan has a higher deductible and/or co-payments or fewer benefits than those offered by your plan, he or she may want to join your health plan instead. You'll also want to compare the rate for one family plan against the cost of two single plans.

It's a good idea to examine your auto insurance coverage, too. If you and your spouse own separate cars, you may have different auto insurance carriers. Consider pooling your auto insurance policies with one company; many insurance companies will give you a discount if you insure more than one car with them. If one of you has a poor driving record, however, make sure that changing companies won't mean paying a higher premium.

Employer-sponsored retirement plans

If both you and your spouse participate in an employer-sponsored retirement plan, you should be aware of each plan's characteristics. Review each plan together carefully and determine which plan provides the best benefits. If you can afford it, you should each participate to the maximum in your own plan. If your current cash flow is limited, you can make one plan the focus of your retirement strategy.

Choosing The Right Method For You

The most important thing in deciding how to combine finances is to be honest about your feelings from the start and always keep an open line of communication. Money is frequently considered to be the biggest strain on relationships, but working together to find solutions that work for everyone can reduce some of the stress.

If you’re looking for some objective outside perspective to help make some of these tough decisions, please feel free to schedule a free consultation. We also have a great checklist for newlyweds – click here to get your copy.

Take Charge of Your Student Debt Repayment Plan

Student loans are a lot like a ball and chain, slowing down what could be a perfectly good financial plan. Outstanding student loan debt in the United States has tripled over the last decade, surpassing both auto and credit card debt to take second place behind housing debt as the most common type of household debt. Today, more than 44 million Americans collectively owe more than $1.4 trillion in student debt. Here are some strategies to pay it off.

Look to your employer for help

The first place to look for help is your employer. While only about 4% of employers offer student debt assistance as an employee benefit, it's predicted that more employers will offer this benefit in the future to attract and retain talent.

Many employers are targeting a student debt assistance benefit of $100 per month.3 That doesn't sound like much, but it adds up. For example, an employee with $31,000 in student loans who is paying them off over 10 years at a 6% interest rate would save about $3,000 in interest and get out of debt two and a half years faster.

Understand all your repayment options

Unfortunately, your student loans aren't going away. But you might be able to choose a repayment option that works best for you. The repayment options available to you will depend on whether you have federal or private student loans. Generally, the federal government offers a broader array of repayment options than private lenders. The following payment options are for federal student loans. (If you have private loans, check with your lender to see which options are available.)

 

Standard plan: You pay a certain amount each month over a 10-year term. If your interest rate is fixed, you'll pay a fixed amount each month; if your interest rate is variable, your monthly payment will change from year to year (but it will be the same each month for the 12 months that a certain interest rate is in effect).

Extended plan: You extend the time you have to pay the loan, typically anywhere from 15 to 30 years. Your monthly payment is lower than it would be under a standard plan, but you'll pay more interest over the life of the loan because the repayment period is longer.

You have $31,000 in student loans with a 6% fixed interest rate. Under a standard plan, your monthly payment would be $344, and your total payment over the term of the loan would be $41,300, of which $10,300 (25%) is interest. Under an extended plan, if the term were increased to 20 years, your monthly payment would be $222, but your total payment over the term of the loan would be $53,302, of which $22,302 (42%) is interest.

Graduated plan: Payments start out low in the early years of the loan, then increase in the later years of the loan. With some graduated repayment plans, the initial lower payment includes both principal and interest, while under other plans the initial lower payment includes interest only.

Income-driven repayment plan: Your monthly payment is based on your income and family size. The federal government offers four income-driven repayment plans for federal student loans only:

 
 
  • Pay As You Earn (PAYE)

  • Revised Pay As You Earn (REPAYE)

  • Income-Based Repayment (IBR)

  • Income-Contingent Repayment (ICR)

 
 

You aren't automatically eligible for these plans; you need to fill out an application (and reapply each year). Depending on the plan, your monthly payment is set between 10% and 20% of your discretionary income, and any remaining loan balance is forgiven at the end of the repayment period (generally 20 or 25 years depending on the plan, but 10 years for borrowers in the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program). For more information on the nuances of these plans or to apply for an income-driven plan, visit the federal student aid website at studentaid.ed.gov.

 

Can you refinance?

Yes, but only with a new private loan. (There is a federal consolidation loan, but that is different.) The main reason for trying to refinance your federal and/or private student loans into a new private loan is to obtain a lower interest rate. You'll need to shop around to see what's available.

If you refinance, your old loans will go away and you will be bound by the terms and conditions of your new private loan. If you had federal student loans, this means you will lose any income-driven repayment options.

Watch out for repayment scams

Beware of scammers contacting you to say that a special federal loan assistance program can permanently reduce your monthly payments and is available for an initial fee or ongoing monthly payments. There is no fee to apply for any federal repayment plan.

Still Need Help?

Student loans can be complicated and can have a significant impact on your long-term financial success. It’s important to develop the right plan for your unique situation. Don’t let your student loan debt derail your financial progress Contact Us for a free consultation.

How Accurate is Your W-4 Withholding?

As you are probably aware, in most cases federal income taxes are withheld from your paychecks. But did you know just how much control you have over the amount that is actually being withheld? In this blog post we’ll discuss the importance of having an accurate W-4 holding, including how recent changes to the tax code present a unique situation for taxpayers in 2018.

W-4 Breakdown

Let’s start with how the W-4 actually works. In a nutshell, your employer adjusts your gross pay and calculates how much federal income tax to withhold from your paycheck based on the withholding allowances you claim on Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Form W-4 (Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate). Each allowance you claim exempts a portion of your income from federal tax withholding and thereby increases what you receive in your paycheck. So, if you claim too many allowances, not enough tax will be withheld from your paycheck, and you will owe the IRS come April 15. If you claim too few allowances? An unnecessarily high amount of tax will be withheld from your paycheck, and you will get a tax refund.

Of course, no one wants to get hit with a large tax bill. But getting a tax refund is not necessarily a better option. It simply means you have paid more than your share in federal income tax and essentially have given the federal government an interest-free loan. As such, the optimal result from a cash flow and financial planning standpoint is to land right in the middle: maximizing income received in each paycheck without owing additional taxes when you file.

Time to check your W-4 Withholding

Best practice is to review your W-4 annually. It is especially important to check when you experience a major life event, such as marriage, birth or adoption of a child, a spouse getting or losing a job, or a significant pay raise or pay cut. Each of these events can directly affect the amount of tax you will owe. This year presents a unique situation, however, because the implementation of the Tax Cut and Jobs Act means that everyone’s tax situation has changed in 2018. With seven new income tax brackets, many people, making the same income in 2018 that they did in 2017, will find themselves in a lower tax bracket. This means more money in their paychecks in 2018 compared with 2017. The new tax law also increased the standard deductions across the board and eliminated miscellaneous itemized deductions.

So what does this mean to you?

The amount you will owe in federal income tax, the deductions you will be able to take, and the amount that should be withheld from your paycheck will have all likely changed.

Finding your “Sweet Spot”

The simplest and most accurate way to determine your appropriate W-4 withholding election is to use the IRS Withholding Calculator, available on the IRS’s website. Keep in mind that this calculator is designed for most taxpayers.

The calculator will ask for your filing status, your family situation, your income, your current withholding, and other information that could affect your 2018 taxes. If the calculator recommends adjusting your withholding, there’s no need to wait! You can adjust your W-4 withholding with your employer at any time, and the change will be reflected in your future paychecks.

Want to learn more?

Of course, this is a general discussion of ensuring accurate W-4 withholdings. If you have additional questions or would like more in-depth information about your withholding, feel free to reach out to me for a free consultation.

 

2018 Commonwealth Financial Network®

Building Your Budget: Start With The Basics

A budget is an estimate of income and expenses for a set period of time. Creating a budget can help you get control of your finances and achieve important financial goals, including buying a car, saving for college, purchasing a home, and providing for a family. It can also be beneficial in meeting unexpected financial challenges, such as losing a job. Honestly I know this doesn't sound fun or exciting, but budgeting will help you improve every aspect of your financial life, and the earlier you begin, the better off you’ll be.

Write down your financial goals.

Before you start evaluating how much you can actually save each month to achieve your important goals, you should consider setting some near-term financial goals. This is essential to tracking your progress. So you need to:

 

· Determine what percentage of your paycheck you would like to save.

· Decide how much money you would like to save each month or how much money you need to save in order to achieve one of your longer-term financial goals.

· Consider how much money you want to allocate to future purchases, as well as how much you want to contribute to an emergency fund and a retirement plan.

 

Whether your goal is to put away a couple of hundred—or a few thousand—dollars every year, you need to know what that amount is. Once you have a realistic idea regarding how much you’d like to save, review the steps below, which can help you determine precisely how much you actually can save.

Next Steps

 

1. Track your income for a month. Figure out how much you make per month. Think in terms of your net income, that is, the amount of money you actually take home (i.e., your net pay) after federal, state and local taxes; contributions to employer-sponsored health insurance; and so forth have been subtracted from your gross pay.

2. Track your expenses for a month. This is the most important step to budget creation. You should record every purchase you make—without exception. No dollar should escape accountability. If you bank online, it is extremely easy to track noncash expenses and debit card charges by simply exporting the information from your user login to a spreadsheet.  

3. Create spending categories. Split your expenses into luxury items and necessities. Necessities would include rent, groceries, car payments, insurance, utilities, and so on. Luxuries would include dining out, entertainment, and other unnecessary items (e.g., extra trips to Starbucks).

To be safe, you should include your saving goal as a necessary item, so you would be less likely to sacrifice saving for other luxuries. Excel is a wonderful tool for this because you can color code your expenses, making it more obvious to tell which type of expense is which.

4. Evaluate your budget. This is the final step in budget preparation. Take a good look at your expenses. Do you see numerous luxury items that you can live without? One benefit to having expenses displayed on an electronic spreadsheet is the ability to make quick and easy calculations. You can set limits on your spending based on the results of your calculations. 

 

Besides preparing yourself for big purchases later in life, your budget can help save you from going into debt in the event of an emergency that requires you to unexpectedly spend a large amount of money.

Check your budget frequently

Keep in mind that it’s important to check your budget frequently to be aware of any changes that may have occurred in your financial situation. Every three months is a good rule of thumb for tracking your spending habits. Not doing so could result in overspending, under saving, and therefore delaying your big financial goals.

What are you waiting for? Get started now!

Now that you know how valuable a budget can be to your financial future and achieving your dreams, what are you waiting for? No doubt you’ll want to begin a savings program as soon as possible. Begin by considering the steps outlined here. Our Wealth Wise Plan program would provide you with personalized financial portal to help you track, monitor and improve your budget and cash flow situation. Contact Us today!

Should You Consolidate Your Retirement Accounts?

If you’re like many of the young professionals I work with every day, myself included, you’ve probably had a few different jobs at this point in your career. In many cases you may have started saving for retirement using the available employer plan or even an individual retirement account (IRA). As you change jobs, it may make sense to consolidate all of your savings into one account to achieve a coordinated investment plan.

Why consolidate?

Consolidating your retirement accounts offers several potential benefits:

 

Less administrative hassle. You’ll receive just one account statement, making it easier to keep track of your funds. Consolidating your accounts also simplifies required minimum distribution calculations and tracking. You’d be surprised how often we discover clients have additional accounts they forgot they even had.

No overlap. If you have multiple accounts, that doesn’t necessarily mean that your investments are properly diversified. In fact, your money may be invested in similar asset classes with significant overlap. Consolidating your retirement accounts gives you a clearer view of your asset allocation picture, as well as any adjustments you may need to make.

Easier rebalancing. Any retirement savings account requires periodic rebalancing to keep it in line with your objectives. By consolidating your accounts, you’re more likely to achieve a cohesive investment strategy.

Proper Beneficiary Management. I can’t tell you how often we see clients with multiple IRAs and 401k plans, all with different beneficiary designations. Even more shocking is how often that information is incorrect or outdated. Consolidation makes it much easier to keep these up to date and accurate.

 

How to consolidate

Moving a retirement account to a new employer plan or to an IRA can be done via direct rollover or trustee-to-trustee transfer.

With a trustee-to-trustee transfer, the funds are sent directly from one plan to another. The plan administrator will make the check payable to your new IRA custodian (never to you directly). That is why this type of transfer is often referred to as a direct rollover. Unlike regular rollovers, there is no tax withholding requirement for this type of transaction. When requesting a transfer from your employer’s plan or another retirement account, be sure to use the right terms to avoid unwanted tax consequences. If you’re unsure, contact your financial planner for assistance.

Should you move your employer plan to an IRA?

A former employer will generally let you keep your money in its retirement plan for as long as you want. You may also choose to move those savings to an IRA. Before making the switch to an IRA, however, it’s wise to consider the following factors:

 

Investment choices. An employer’s 401(k) plan may be lower cost, but your choice of investments will be limited, as 401(k) plan sponsors tend to simplify the investment decision for employees by reducing the number of options. With an IRA, you have a potentially unlimited choice of investments, including individual stocks, mutual funds, and alternative investments rarely offered by employer plans.

Control over distributions. Another benefit of IRAs is that you have more control over when your retirement savings are paid to you. Distribution requirements vary among IRA providers, so be sure to understand the choices available to you and your beneficiaries.

Creditor protection. If creditor protection is a concern, both employer plans and IRAs safeguard your retirement savings from creditors to a certain extent. Employer plans generally offer better protection than IRAs do, however. The level of protection an IRA offers depends on your state laws.

Early withdrawal. One reason to keep funds in an employer account, at least temporarily, is that you may need to tap into your retirement savings before you reach age 59½. There is no tax penalty for taking a distribution from your former employer’s plan after you reach age 55. Although you’ll still pay income taxes, you will avoid the 10-percent penalty for early withdrawal, which would be assessed if you withdrew funds from an IRA before age 59½. Exceptions to the penalty on early IRA distributions include:

 
 
  • Unreimbursed medical expenses that amount to more than 10 percent of your adjusted gross income
  • Disability
  • Distributions from a beneficiary IRA upon the death of the original IRA owner
  • Qualified higher-education expenses
  • Qualified first-time home purchase
  • Distributions under a “substantially equal payment” plan, per Section 72(t) of the Internal Revenue Code
 

A Retirement Strategy That Works For You

As you can see there are some great benefits to consolidating your retirement accounts, however, there are many factors that should be considered. I recommend working with a financial planner to determine what is right for you. Please feel free to reach out to me if you have questions. I'd rather develop the best strategy for you and help you implement it properly, than you potentially creating issues trying to do it yourself.

Is a 529 the Best Way to Save for College?

For parents with aspirations of sending their children to college, the costs associated with doing so can be daunting. For decades, the price of higher education has risen at a rate close to three times that of the Consumer Price Index. And although the rate of increase recently has subsided to some degree, this expense continues to be among the most significant faced by parents. 

Let's consider the following statistics:

 
  • According to Trends in College Pricing 2017 produced by The College Board, a nonprofit organization serving students and schools, the average published tuition and fees for in-state students at public four-year colleges and universities for 2017–2018 are $20,770.
  • In addition, the study states that the average published tuition and fees at private four-year colleges and universities for 2017–2018 are $46,950.
 

There is no question that the pursuit of higher education will come at a substantial cost.  You may be searching for the best way to save for that moment when your child leaves home and the bills roll in. To celebrate National 529 Day, let's take a closer look at 529 plans and their effectiveness when it comes to saving for college.

What is a 529 plan anyway?

Excellent question and probably a great place to start! A 529 plan is a qualified tuition savings program listed in section 529 of the Internal Revenue Code. While these plans are governed by federal law, the 529 plan itself is sponsored by the individual state and managed by a mutual fund company that provides the underlying investment choices for the plan. If the state savings plan meets the federal requirements, the plan’s balance and the future distributions from the plan receive favorable tax treatment.

Income tax benefits

A 529 plan provides some very nice tax benefits, with the primary benefit found in the tax treatment of contributions, earnings, and distributions. Contributions to a 529 plan are typically invested in a mixture of stock and bond mutual funds. Similar to an IRA, the earnings on the contributions are tax deferred; however, unlike a traditional IRA, distributions from the 529 plan are tax free, as long as they are used to pay for qualified higher education expenses.

Qualified higher education expenses are defined as expenses incurred for the enrollment and attendance of a full- or part-time student at an eligible educational institution. Common qualifying expenses for both full- and part-time students include tuition, books, supplies, and associated fees.  For a detailed list of what is included, visit www.savingforcollege.com

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 includes an expansion of 529 savings plans that allows families to save for K−12 expenses as well as college expenses. 529 plans will be able to use qualified distributions of up to $10,000 per year, per student, for elementary and secondary school expenses.

The effect on financial aid

529 plans not only provide substantial income, gift, and estate tax savings, but they also often have minimal effects on financial aid. 529 plans owned by parents are considered parental assets; this means they are assessed at a rate of 5.64 percent when determining how much a family is expected to contribute to tuition costs. Plans owned by students are considered student assets; student assets are assessed at a much higher rate of 20 percent. Qualifying distributions from 529 plans also receive advantageous treatment when determining eligibility for the subsequent year of financial aid. 

A wise choice

When considering all of the options available to parents, a 529 plan offers the most beneficial means to save for college. Tax deferral on the growth of underlying investments, tax-free withdrawals for qualifying higher education expenses, the possibility of a state income tax deduction, the low impact on eligibility for financial aid, and the gift and estate tax benefits make a 529 plan an excellent vehicle for saving toward higher education goals.

If you'd like to discuss what makes the most sense for you, please don't hesitate to give us a call. 

 

The fees, expenses and features of 529 plans can vary from state to state. 529 plans involve investment risk, including the possible loss of funds. There is no guarantee that a college-funding goal will be met. The earnings portion of a nonqualified withdrawal will be subject to ordinary income tax at the recipient’s marginal rate and subject to a 10% penalty. By investing in a plan outside of your state residence, you may lose any state tax benefits. 529 plans are subject to enrollment, maintenance and administrative/management fees and expenses.

What is the Big Deal with Bitcoin?

I certainly wasn't surprised when I started getting the "should I buy Bitcoin" questions - the media attention alone drives people to it. The troubling part though, is in many cases these questions are coming from people who aren't following any of the basic personal finance principles.

I will tell you how to become rich. Close the doors. Be fearful when others are greedy. Be greedy when others are fearful.
                                                   - Warren Buffett

Easily one of my favorite quotes from Warren Buffett and for good reason - investor behavior never fails!

"Cryptocurrency" is arguably the most popular buzzword in the global economy right now. While Bitcoin is currently the most well-known cryptocurrency, most people don't understand it beyond the hype and reported skyrocketing value.

The overarching goal of any cryptocurrency is to replace cash, credit, and electronic wire transactions with a digital medium of exchange that isn’t issued by any bank or backed by any federal government.

Small Transactions

Bitcoin was originally viewed as an ideal system for small online transactions, like credit card fees. However, because those online fees are too expensive for retailers—plus with a limited supply and varying demand—Bitcoin’s real-world application has been hampered. To date, only a few established retailers will accept Bitcoin as a form of payment. Among them, you'll find names such as Overstock, Expedia, Newegg, and Dish Network.

Scarcity

Bitcoin’s high level of scarcity has partly influenced its reported high market value. Although you can purchase Bitcoin using online cryptocurrency exchanges, Bitcoin was originally earned via a process known as mining, which is basically a lottery system using a specialized computer program. This lottery system favors those with the biggest and fastest machines, which means people will always need better programs and higher Bitcoin prices to make mining worthwhile—leading to its scarce supply.

The Influence of Cryptocurrency

At this time, it’s hard to tell how much cryptocurrencies are influencing the markets. There are currently at least six other forms of cryptocurrency worthy of attention in the marketplace—and in recent months and years, upwards of 3,000 other cryptocurrencies have been developed and released since Bitcoin was created. However, many of them died out due to a lack of interest and use.

The Future of Cryptocurrency

Governments around the globe are looking at the potential for regulating cryptocurrencies. At the moment, Bitcoin is controlled by a global network of computers that track all purchases and transactions through a system known as Blockchain.

Blockchain keeps Bitcoin decentralized, making it hard for governments and regulatory bodies to control it and other cryptocurrencies. The decentralized nature of Bitcoin, plus its surging value, is diminishing its chances of becoming a more widespread currency. At the moment, most people are turning to Bitcoin as a means of investing with hopes of a big payoff, rather than using it in commercial transactions.

Reports of investors who bought Bitcoin early and generated wealth has led to droves of people precariously investing in the cryptocurrency based on emotion and fear of missing out. As with any investment, there is risk involved with investing in cryptocurrency, and no one can predict its future value.

It’s important to keep an eye on your long-term goals, and before investing in cryptocurrencies, talk to a financial planner to make sure your investment aligns with your financial plan. 

 

This article is intended strictly for educational purposes only and is not a recommendation for or against cryptocurrency.