RSUs

How Do Restricted Stock Units Work?

A question I often get from clients and friends – “I have these things called Restricted Stock Units (RSUs)what are they and how do they work?”

An RSU is a contractual right to receive company shares or an equivalent cash payment at some point in the future. They are an increasingly popular form of equity award offered by companies of all shapes and sizes. Many companies here in the Raleigh-Durham area have shifted to RSUs because they are administratively convenient, are “easy” for employees to understand, and can be structured in a way that helps attract and retain key employees and drive performance.

So with that in mind, let’s take a closer look at what RSUs are and how they can work for you.

You’ve been granted RSUs: Now what?

If you’ve been granted RSUs, congratulations! It’s most certainly not a bad thing! You have likely been given this equity award because you are valued, and your employer wants you to stay with the company and meet certain performance benchmarks. But it’s important to understand that your employer has merely promised to deliver shares (or an equivalent cash payment) to you at a future date. As such, RSUs can be thought of as a form of deferred compensation.

You do not owe any tax at the time of the RSU grant. In fact, you will not owe tax until you actually receive the shares. RSUs typically come with a vesting schedule, and there may be performance conditions that must be satisfied before the stock can be delivered. Unlike a stock option, your RSU has intrinsic value; whether the value of the company increases or decreases after the grant, the stock will have value and can never be “out of the money.”

What happens when RSUs vest?

Once RSUs vest, they will be delivered to you and you will recognize ordinary income based on the fair market value of the stock at the time of delivery. Unlike with stock options, no analysis regarding when to exercise is needed. In most cases, the employer will withhold shares in order to cover the tax, delivering the net shares to you. You may have additional options for withholding, you may be able to elect to receive cash instead of stock, or you may be able to defer the delivery of the shares beyond the vesting date. Be sure to check your plan document to ensure that you understand all of your options.

Once you own the employer stock, you are free to hold it or sell it immediately. Your cost basis in the shares is the fair market value on the date they were delivered. So, if you sell the shares immediately, there will be no additional taxable gain. But if you choose to hold the shares and sell them down the road? You would pay capital gains tax on any gains earned since you acquired the shares; if the shares decrease in value, you would have a capital loss that you can use to offset other capital gains.

Planning questions you should be asking

 

·       Should I hold or sell?

·       What happens if I leave the company?

·       What if I’m planning to retire?

·       What’s the risk?

·       Will I be pushed into a higher tax bracket?

 

A valuable benefit

RSUs can be a valuable piece of an employee benefits package, especially when they are incorporated into a financial plan. As you can see – there are lots of moving parts and several important questions that need to be reviewed. Working with a financial advisor and tax professional can help you plan accordingly and make the most out of your RSUs.

Still confused or want to talk about your situation – contact us and we’d be happy to schedule a time that is convenient for you.

Are You Maximizing Your Employee Benefits?

For many of you, your salary and bonus are likely just a part of the total compensation you receive from your employer. Why not give yourself a raise by learning about and taking advantage of all your company benefits? This article will help you ensure that you’re making the most of the benefits your employer offers.

Retirement Plans

Your company’s 401(k) plan can play an important role in your future financial security. If your employer matches contributions, you should be contributing at least enough to get the maximum match. If you plan to max out your contributions, make sure you don’t do so too early in the year and potentially miss out on the matching.

For those of you that are considered highly compensated, your employer may also provide a nonqualified deferred compensation plan with matching to cover wages above the qualified limit. It is important to find out how the plans interact and how you can maximize your benefit.

Stock Options and RSUs

Some companies still grant employee stock options as a form of compensation. These can add significant value to your long-term financial success, but they can be complicated and have additional risk that needs to be considered.

 
  • Risk of termination before vesting

  • Risk of market volatility in the stock price

  • Risk of asset concentration

 

There are also several tax considerations that need to be evaluated when working with stock options and RSUs. I recommend working with a financial advisor to determine what works best for you.

Health Insurance

Many companies subsidize health insurance coverage for their employees, and some offer a choice of different plans.

 
  • HMOs generally have lower premiums and lower costs to access health care but limit which providers you can see.

  • PPOs allow you to choose any physician, but they charge higher fees if you decide to see an out-of-network provider.

 

Before selecting a plan, I recommend confirming that your doctor is a preferred provider.

If one of your health insurance choices is a high-deductible health plan, you may have the option to set aside money in a health savings account (HSA) to pay for qualified health care expenses on a pretax basis. HSA contributions remain in your account until you use them, distributions for qualified medical expenses are tax-free, and the account is portable. Some companies even contribute to employees’ HSA accounts.

Flexible Spending Account

Your company may offer flexible spending accounts (FSAs) for a variety of expenses, including health care, dependent care, transportation, and parking. If you have any of these qualified expenses, you may benefit by having pretax money taken out of your paycheck to fund them. For example, if it costs you $100 per month to park at work, you can set aside that amount in an FSA to cover the expense. By contrast, you’d have to earn $157.36 to pay for this expense after taxes, assuming a total tax rate of 36.45 percent.

Life and Disability Insurance

Some employers provide life insurance coverage equal to a multiple of your salary. In many cases you may be able to purchase group supplemental life insurance coverage through payroll deductions. While this can be convenient, the coverage amounts and features may be limited, so I recommend shopping the market to ensure that you’re getting coverage at the best price.

Your employer may also pay for long-term disability insurance. LTD payments from an employer-paid policy are taxable to you; if you pay the premiums, you will receive LTD payments tax-free. If your company gives you the option of paying for your own LTD coverage, you should weigh the cost of covering the premiums yourself versus the benefit of receiving tax-free payments.

Additional Benefits

Some companies offer employee discounts on everything from wireless plans and vision care to movie tickets, hotels, and car rentals. Your employer may also offer reimbursement for certain education expenses.

I see far too often employees missing out on key employer benefits. Working with an adviser and doing a little research could be well worth your while! Contact Us today so we can help you maximize your benefits.