Student Loan Debt

Financial Planning: Helping You See The Big Picture

As a financial planner, it always shocks me to hear some of the reasons people have for not having a financial plan in place.

“I don’t have enough money yet”

“I’m too young”

“It’s too expensive”

The question I usually respond with is: “Do you picture yourself owning a new home, launching a business, starting a family or retiring comfortably?”  These are just a few of the financial goals that may be important to you, and each comes with a price tag.

This is where financial planning comes in. Financial planning helps you target your goals by evaluating your whole financial picture and outlining strategies that are tailored to your individual needs and available resources.

Why is financial planning important?

A financial plan serves as a framework for organizing all of the pieces of your financial life. With a financial plan in place, you'll be able to focus on your goals and understand what it will take to reach them.

One of the main benefits of having a financial plan is that it can help you balance competing financial priorities. A financial plan will clearly show you how your financial goals are related--for example, how saving for your children's college education might impact your ability to save for retirement. Then you can use that information to decide how to prioritize your goals, implement specific strategies, and choose suitable products or services. Best of all, you'll know that your financial life is headed in the right direction.

The financial planning process

Creating and implementing a comprehensive financial plan generally involves working with financial professionals to:

 
  • Develop a clear picture of your current financial situation by reviewing your income, assets, and liabilities, and evaluating your insurance coverage, your investment portfolio, your tax exposure, and your estate plan

  • Establish and prioritize financial goals and time frames for achieving these goals

  • Implement strategies that address your current financial weaknesses and build on your financial strengths

  • Choose specific products and services that are tailored to help meet your financial objectives

  • Monitor your plan, making adjustments as your goals, time frames, or circumstances change

 

Why can't I do it myself?

If you have enough time and knowledge - you absolutely can. Keep in mind that developing a comprehensive financial plan typically require expertise in several areas. It is also difficult to give yourself objective advice. A financial professional can give you, fact-based information and help you weigh your alternatives, saving you time and ensuring that all angles of your financial picture are covered.

Staying on track

The financial planning process doesn't end once your initial plan has been created. Your plan should be reviewed at least once a year to make sure that it's up-to-date. It's also possible that you'll need to modify your plan due to changes in your personal circumstances or the economy.

Common questions about financial planning

 

What if I'm too busy?

Don't wait until you're in the midst of a financial crisis or 10 years out from retirement before beginning the planning process. The sooner you start, the more options you may have.

Is it expensive?

This a typical assumption based on some stereotypes that are quickly becoming outdated. If you envision an older man in a fancy office who profits off the financial products you buy — well, it’s probably time to take another look. We’ve redesigned the cost to be more affordable for the younger generations. 

Is the financial planning process complicated?

Each financial plan is tailored to the needs of the individual, so how complicated the process will be depends on your individual circumstances. But no matter what type of help you need, the goal is to make the process as easy as possible.

What if my spouse and I disagree?

This is more common than you would think, but I’ve been trained to listen to your concerns, identify any underlying issues, and help you find common ground.

 

Conclusion

Your financial health — just like the physical or mental kind — takes time and effort. We all have financial goals and, in many cases, there are several that require our attention at any given time. Having a well-designed financial plan in place will help you navigate those important decisions and keep you on track. By starting earlier in life, you have the advantage of time. Don’t let your “fears” stand in the way of making real progress.

As a financial planner, my goal is to make every effort to help you make smart financial decisions and hopefully avoid making crucial mistakes. I’m invested in your success. If you’re on the fence, please reach out and ask me questions.

Take Charge of Your Student Debt Repayment Plan

Student loans are a lot like a ball and chain, slowing down what could be a perfectly good financial plan. Outstanding student loan debt in the United States has tripled over the last decade, surpassing both auto and credit card debt to take second place behind housing debt as the most common type of household debt. Today, more than 44 million Americans collectively owe more than $1.4 trillion in student debt. Here are some strategies to pay it off.

Look to your employer for help

The first place to look for help is your employer. While only about 4% of employers offer student debt assistance as an employee benefit, it's predicted that more employers will offer this benefit in the future to attract and retain talent.

Many employers are targeting a student debt assistance benefit of $100 per month.3 That doesn't sound like much, but it adds up. For example, an employee with $31,000 in student loans who is paying them off over 10 years at a 6% interest rate would save about $3,000 in interest and get out of debt two and a half years faster.

Understand all your repayment options

Unfortunately, your student loans aren't going away. But you might be able to choose a repayment option that works best for you. The repayment options available to you will depend on whether you have federal or private student loans. Generally, the federal government offers a broader array of repayment options than private lenders. The following payment options are for federal student loans. (If you have private loans, check with your lender to see which options are available.)

 

Standard plan: You pay a certain amount each month over a 10-year term. If your interest rate is fixed, you'll pay a fixed amount each month; if your interest rate is variable, your monthly payment will change from year to year (but it will be the same each month for the 12 months that a certain interest rate is in effect).

Extended plan: You extend the time you have to pay the loan, typically anywhere from 15 to 30 years. Your monthly payment is lower than it would be under a standard plan, but you'll pay more interest over the life of the loan because the repayment period is longer.

You have $31,000 in student loans with a 6% fixed interest rate. Under a standard plan, your monthly payment would be $344, and your total payment over the term of the loan would be $41,300, of which $10,300 (25%) is interest. Under an extended plan, if the term were increased to 20 years, your monthly payment would be $222, but your total payment over the term of the loan would be $53,302, of which $22,302 (42%) is interest.

Graduated plan: Payments start out low in the early years of the loan, then increase in the later years of the loan. With some graduated repayment plans, the initial lower payment includes both principal and interest, while under other plans the initial lower payment includes interest only.

Income-driven repayment plan: Your monthly payment is based on your income and family size. The federal government offers four income-driven repayment plans for federal student loans only:

 
 
  • Pay As You Earn (PAYE)

  • Revised Pay As You Earn (REPAYE)

  • Income-Based Repayment (IBR)

  • Income-Contingent Repayment (ICR)

 
 

You aren't automatically eligible for these plans; you need to fill out an application (and reapply each year). Depending on the plan, your monthly payment is set between 10% and 20% of your discretionary income, and any remaining loan balance is forgiven at the end of the repayment period (generally 20 or 25 years depending on the plan, but 10 years for borrowers in the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program). For more information on the nuances of these plans or to apply for an income-driven plan, visit the federal student aid website at studentaid.ed.gov.

 

Can you refinance?

Yes, but only with a new private loan. (There is a federal consolidation loan, but that is different.) The main reason for trying to refinance your federal and/or private student loans into a new private loan is to obtain a lower interest rate. You'll need to shop around to see what's available.

If you refinance, your old loans will go away and you will be bound by the terms and conditions of your new private loan. If you had federal student loans, this means you will lose any income-driven repayment options.

Watch out for repayment scams

Beware of scammers contacting you to say that a special federal loan assistance program can permanently reduce your monthly payments and is available for an initial fee or ongoing monthly payments. There is no fee to apply for any federal repayment plan.

Still Need Help?

Student loans can be complicated and can have a significant impact on your long-term financial success. It’s important to develop the right plan for your unique situation. Don’t let your student loan debt derail your financial progress Contact Us for a free consultation.