Wealth Wise

Six Reasons You Need More Than A Robo-Advisor

You may have read about the rise of so-called “robo-advisors”, online investing platforms that use computer-generated algorithms to create strategies and manage your money.

These platforms provide simple portfolio management with very little human interaction at rock-bottom prices. With the increasing popularity of these platforms, you might be asking yourself: Do I even need a financial advisor?

I think you do. Here are 6 reasons why:

 

Reason 1 | We Treat You like a person, not just an account number

We put you at the center of everything we do. Our meticulous discovery process thoroughly drills down into your unique personality, goals and needs. We think clients have better financial outcomes with custom-built strategies. Robo-advisors use algorithms to fit you into pre-existing strategies based on your age, risk tolerance, and investment horizon. They can’t fully understand your unique needs because they’ve never met you personally.

Reason 2 | We keep you involved in investment decisions

We emphasize ongoing, personalized communication because we believe informed clients make more intelligent financial decisions. We customize our level of communication to your desires and present you with as little or as much technical detail as you would like. Robo-advisors are targeted towards clients who prefer a hands-off approach to investing – one that does not allow for talking through things face-to-face.

Reason 3 | We coach, guide and hold you accountable

Everyone has different purposes for their money; we help you define it and hold you accountable to the strategies we create together. Think of us as a real-life financial coach. Robo-advisor algorithms are designed around simplistic variables like age, target retirement date, risk tolerance and income level. A computer doesn’t care if you reach your goals.

Reason 4 | We Make Sure Your Financial Strategies Keep up with your life

We proactively monitor your strategies and update them as your needs change. When you pass one of life’s important milestones, we’ll know and make sure your strategies keep up with your life. Robo-advisors use automated re-balancing algorithms to make changes to your portfolio. They don’t know when you get married, have a child, or buy a house.

Reason 5 | We provide knowledgeable answers from someone you know

We offer you easy access to an experienced professional who knows you and understands your situation. Whatever your issue, we can get you the answer you need, quickly and confidently. Most robo-advisors send you to a help forum or customer service center when you have questions. Even if there is a person assigned to your account, you could be just one of hundreds they speak with every day.

Reason 6 | Your life is about more than investing

We help our clients prepare for all of life’s important financial milestones: a house, paying off debt, funding a college education, a bucket list, vacation, as well as retirement. Robo-advisors are designed to focus mostly on investing. For our clients, comprehensive wealth strategies are about much more than just their investment portfolio.

 

The Bottom Line

The good news is that you don’t have to forego the benefits of working with an online investing platform when you work with us. Wealth Wise was designed to utilize robust technology to offer many of the same features and benefits that our online competitors do, but with human interaction you deserve.

Want to talk about how we can help you do more with your financial life?


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Ramping Up Your Retirement Savings

No matter where you are in your life, saving for retirement is likely one of your most important financial goals. But, even if you have professional guidance and a clear strategy for your desired future, you could still be missing some straightforward ways to maximize your savings.

The reality is: Most people do not save enough money for retirement. In fact, the National Institute on Retirement Security estimates that Americans have at least a $6.8 trillion gap between the amount they have saved and the amount they need.  Alarmingly, they found the gap could be as high as $14 trillion.

While we are always here to help you address major life events and financial changes, we also wanted to share some simple ways to increase your savings now.

 

Reevaluate Small Budget Items

Changing major aspects of your budget — such as your housing or healthcare costs — can significantly impact your savings potential, but may also take time to implement. To start saving more today, look at the little places where you spend money and see where you can trim your expenses. For example, do you eat lunch out every day or buy a specialty coffee most mornings? Do you have entertainment packages you aren’t really using, such as cable TV or online memberships? Saving a few dollars each day can add up to thousands of dollars over a year, which is money you can put toward your retirement.

Remember to Imagine the Retirement You Desire

Effective retirement strategies often focus on building a clear vision of how you would like to spend life after your career. As you go about your daily life and make financial decisions, how often do you reflect on this vision? Rather than only thinking about your retirement goals during financial reviews or major choices, start incorporating this picture into your regular decision-making process. For example, each time you make a purchase, ask yourself if you’d rather have this item or put the money toward the retirement you desire. You may discover that by grounding each purchase in this way, you spend less on items you don’t really care about — and have more money to put toward the retirement you’ve dreamed about. 

Capture Your Employer’s Full 401(k) Match

U.S. employees lose $24 billion a year by not saving enough in their 401(k) to claim their company’s full matching. If your employer matches your retirement contributions, make sure you contribute at least enough to claim what is essentially free money. And if you are age 50 or older, remember that you can contribute an extra $6,000 each year to your 401(k) on top of the $18,000 annual limit.

Invest Additional Funds

When you receive a raise, bonus, tax refund, inheritance, or other financial windfall, spending the funds can be very tempting. Instead, if you choose to invest this money into your retirement, you can boost your savings without affecting your current bottom line. In addition, if you put a bonus into a 401(k) or IRA, you may also enjoy tax benefits and not owe anything until you withdraw the funds.

 

Saving for retirement is a big responsibility, but it does not have to be a burden. With these simple changes — and support from professionals who care about your future — you can focus on creating a lifestyle that matches your dreams. We are here to help you at each step, so please let us know if you have any questions about these tips or the bigger strategies guiding your retirement.

National Financial Literacy Month

Did you know that April is National Financial Literacy Month?

What started out as a financial-literacy awareness day more than a decade ago is now a month-long campaign. The program is designed to highlight the importance of financial literacy and teach people of all ages how to manage their money wisely. And, according to recent surveys, Americans have a lot of room to improve in their financial knowledge.

About 40% of those surveyed spend less than they earn. The other 60% are either breaking even or spending more than they earn, which means they are unable to save money steadily.

It’s no surprise then that the study also shows that 50% of Americans don’t have a “rainy day” fund to cover expenses for three months — in case of emergencies such as sickness, job loss or economic downturn. Those without an emergency savings face unexpected financial blows that not only compromise their personal financial stability, but decrease overall economic stability as well.

Let’s look at three tips that could enhance your financial literacy, or that of one of your friends or family members.

Set and Follow a Budget that Works for You

There are norms in budgeting, but those are variable and defined by influences out of your control, including your zip code and tax bracket. Ask yourself what your normal is. An estimation tool you might use is the 50/30/20 rule. That ratio breaks down like this:

  • 50% of net income: Spend about 50% of your take-home pay on “fixed costs” — bills that are about the same amount each month. This might include things such as rent/mortgage, car payments, utilities, cell phone service, and memberships or subscriptions (Netflix, gym, Spotify).
  • 30% of net income: In the 50/30/20 plan, about 30% of your net pay would go toward flexible spending — also commonly called disposable income or lifestyle expenses. These might include costs for hobbies, shopping, and entertainment. We will include gas and groceries in this category because even though they are needs, how you spend your money on these things might vary. One month, you might travel, which means you might spend more that month on gas and food/groceries.

  • 20% of net income: Reserve about 20% of your net income for your financial goals. Three important goals to think about are paying down credit-card debt, saving for retirement, and building that emergency fund.

Manage your habits; change them if needed so they work for you. And remember that financial stability doesn’t necessarily mean mortgages and car payments. Determine your normal.

Start Saving Now

Saving money is easy to put off doing, since the consequences of not steadily saving may not be noticed or felt until later in life when you try to buy a house, send your kids to a top college or retire at a certain age.

So, start now — one of the easiest ways to make regular savings deposits is to pay yourself first from each paycheck. That way, it’s gone before you even notice it’s missing. Though saving for retirement usually is priority, you might also want to make sure you have financial reserves for emergencies.

Set Specific Financial Goals

It's never too soon, or too late to set financial goals.The first steps to setting financials goals include:

  • securing a steady source of income;

  • making sure you have financial reserves;

  • protecting yourself and your family from financial upheavals or disaster by buying the right insurance for life, health, disability income, and possessions.

Getting further ahead each year takes patience and planning. If your reserves stay flat, inflation will diminish its value. Stay alert and ready to go after opportunities to grow your money.

Think about what your personal financial goals are — sorting them by wants or needs might help. Decide which ones are long-term or short-term goals and prioritize them. Choose goals you’re enthusiastic about to help you reach them.

With your 50/30/20 budget, you should be able to distribute your limited resources in ways that make it possible to reach your goals.

We specifically designed Wealth Wise to offer the next generation an opportunity to start now. If you have questions or would like to learn more about certain financial topics, we are happy to talk. If you think you're ready to start planning, check out Wealth Wise Plan.