Young Professionals

Financial Planning: Helping You See The Big Picture

As a financial planner, it always shocks me to hear some of the reasons people have for not having a financial plan in place.

“I don’t have enough money yet”

“I’m too young”

“It’s too expensive”

The question I usually respond with is: “Do you picture yourself owning a new home, launching a business, starting a family or retiring comfortably?”  These are just a few of the financial goals that may be important to you, and each comes with a price tag.

This is where financial planning comes in. Financial planning helps you target your goals by evaluating your whole financial picture and outlining strategies that are tailored to your individual needs and available resources.

Why is financial planning important?

A financial plan serves as a framework for organizing all of the pieces of your financial life. With a financial plan in place, you'll be able to focus on your goals and understand what it will take to reach them.

One of the main benefits of having a financial plan is that it can help you balance competing financial priorities. A financial plan will clearly show you how your financial goals are related--for example, how saving for your children's college education might impact your ability to save for retirement. Then you can use that information to decide how to prioritize your goals, implement specific strategies, and choose suitable products or services. Best of all, you'll know that your financial life is headed in the right direction.

The financial planning process

Creating and implementing a comprehensive financial plan generally involves working with financial professionals to:

 
  • Develop a clear picture of your current financial situation by reviewing your income, assets, and liabilities, and evaluating your insurance coverage, your investment portfolio, your tax exposure, and your estate plan

  • Establish and prioritize financial goals and time frames for achieving these goals

  • Implement strategies that address your current financial weaknesses and build on your financial strengths

  • Choose specific products and services that are tailored to help meet your financial objectives

  • Monitor your plan, making adjustments as your goals, time frames, or circumstances change

 

Why can't I do it myself?

If you have enough time and knowledge - you absolutely can. Keep in mind that developing a comprehensive financial plan typically require expertise in several areas. It is also difficult to give yourself objective advice. A financial professional can give you, fact-based information and help you weigh your alternatives, saving you time and ensuring that all angles of your financial picture are covered.

Staying on track

The financial planning process doesn't end once your initial plan has been created. Your plan should be reviewed at least once a year to make sure that it's up-to-date. It's also possible that you'll need to modify your plan due to changes in your personal circumstances or the economy.

Common questions about financial planning

 

What if I'm too busy?

Don't wait until you're in the midst of a financial crisis or 10 years out from retirement before beginning the planning process. The sooner you start, the more options you may have.

Is it expensive?

This a typical assumption based on some stereotypes that are quickly becoming outdated. If you envision an older man in a fancy office who profits off the financial products you buy — well, it’s probably time to take another look. We’ve redesigned the cost to be more affordable for the younger generations. 

Is the financial planning process complicated?

Each financial plan is tailored to the needs of the individual, so how complicated the process will be depends on your individual circumstances. But no matter what type of help you need, the goal is to make the process as easy as possible.

What if my spouse and I disagree?

This is more common than you would think, but I’ve been trained to listen to your concerns, identify any underlying issues, and help you find common ground.

 

Conclusion

Your financial health — just like the physical or mental kind — takes time and effort. We all have financial goals and, in many cases, there are several that require our attention at any given time. Having a well-designed financial plan in place will help you navigate those important decisions and keep you on track. By starting earlier in life, you have the advantage of time. Don’t let your “fears” stand in the way of making real progress.

As a financial planner, my goal is to make every effort to help you make smart financial decisions and hopefully avoid making crucial mistakes. I’m invested in your success. If you’re on the fence, please reach out and ask me questions.

Take Charge of Your Student Debt Repayment Plan

Student loans are a lot like a ball and chain, slowing down what could be a perfectly good financial plan. Outstanding student loan debt in the United States has tripled over the last decade, surpassing both auto and credit card debt to take second place behind housing debt as the most common type of household debt. Today, more than 44 million Americans collectively owe more than $1.4 trillion in student debt. Here are some strategies to pay it off.

Look to your employer for help

The first place to look for help is your employer. While only about 4% of employers offer student debt assistance as an employee benefit, it's predicted that more employers will offer this benefit in the future to attract and retain talent.

Many employers are targeting a student debt assistance benefit of $100 per month.3 That doesn't sound like much, but it adds up. For example, an employee with $31,000 in student loans who is paying them off over 10 years at a 6% interest rate would save about $3,000 in interest and get out of debt two and a half years faster.

Understand all your repayment options

Unfortunately, your student loans aren't going away. But you might be able to choose a repayment option that works best for you. The repayment options available to you will depend on whether you have federal or private student loans. Generally, the federal government offers a broader array of repayment options than private lenders. The following payment options are for federal student loans. (If you have private loans, check with your lender to see which options are available.)

 

Standard plan: You pay a certain amount each month over a 10-year term. If your interest rate is fixed, you'll pay a fixed amount each month; if your interest rate is variable, your monthly payment will change from year to year (but it will be the same each month for the 12 months that a certain interest rate is in effect).

Extended plan: You extend the time you have to pay the loan, typically anywhere from 15 to 30 years. Your monthly payment is lower than it would be under a standard plan, but you'll pay more interest over the life of the loan because the repayment period is longer.

You have $31,000 in student loans with a 6% fixed interest rate. Under a standard plan, your monthly payment would be $344, and your total payment over the term of the loan would be $41,300, of which $10,300 (25%) is interest. Under an extended plan, if the term were increased to 20 years, your monthly payment would be $222, but your total payment over the term of the loan would be $53,302, of which $22,302 (42%) is interest.

Graduated plan: Payments start out low in the early years of the loan, then increase in the later years of the loan. With some graduated repayment plans, the initial lower payment includes both principal and interest, while under other plans the initial lower payment includes interest only.

Income-driven repayment plan: Your monthly payment is based on your income and family size. The federal government offers four income-driven repayment plans for federal student loans only:

 
 
  • Pay As You Earn (PAYE)

  • Revised Pay As You Earn (REPAYE)

  • Income-Based Repayment (IBR)

  • Income-Contingent Repayment (ICR)

 
 

You aren't automatically eligible for these plans; you need to fill out an application (and reapply each year). Depending on the plan, your monthly payment is set between 10% and 20% of your discretionary income, and any remaining loan balance is forgiven at the end of the repayment period (generally 20 or 25 years depending on the plan, but 10 years for borrowers in the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program). For more information on the nuances of these plans or to apply for an income-driven plan, visit the federal student aid website at studentaid.ed.gov.

 

Can you refinance?

Yes, but only with a new private loan. (There is a federal consolidation loan, but that is different.) The main reason for trying to refinance your federal and/or private student loans into a new private loan is to obtain a lower interest rate. You'll need to shop around to see what's available.

If you refinance, your old loans will go away and you will be bound by the terms and conditions of your new private loan. If you had federal student loans, this means you will lose any income-driven repayment options.

Watch out for repayment scams

Beware of scammers contacting you to say that a special federal loan assistance program can permanently reduce your monthly payments and is available for an initial fee or ongoing monthly payments. There is no fee to apply for any federal repayment plan.

Still Need Help?

Student loans can be complicated and can have a significant impact on your long-term financial success. It’s important to develop the right plan for your unique situation. Don’t let your student loan debt derail your financial progress Contact Us for a free consultation.

How Accurate is Your W-4 Withholding?

As you are probably aware, in most cases federal income taxes are withheld from your paychecks. But did you know just how much control you have over the amount that is actually being withheld? In this blog post we’ll discuss the importance of having an accurate W-4 holding, including how recent changes to the tax code present a unique situation for taxpayers in 2018.

W-4 Breakdown

Let’s start with how the W-4 actually works. In a nutshell, your employer adjusts your gross pay and calculates how much federal income tax to withhold from your paycheck based on the withholding allowances you claim on Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Form W-4 (Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate). Each allowance you claim exempts a portion of your income from federal tax withholding and thereby increases what you receive in your paycheck. So, if you claim too many allowances, not enough tax will be withheld from your paycheck, and you will owe the IRS come April 15. If you claim too few allowances? An unnecessarily high amount of tax will be withheld from your paycheck, and you will get a tax refund.

Of course, no one wants to get hit with a large tax bill. But getting a tax refund is not necessarily a better option. It simply means you have paid more than your share in federal income tax and essentially have given the federal government an interest-free loan. As such, the optimal result from a cash flow and financial planning standpoint is to land right in the middle: maximizing income received in each paycheck without owing additional taxes when you file.

Time to check your W-4 Withholding

Best practice is to review your W-4 annually. It is especially important to check when you experience a major life event, such as marriage, birth or adoption of a child, a spouse getting or losing a job, or a significant pay raise or pay cut. Each of these events can directly affect the amount of tax you will owe. This year presents a unique situation, however, because the implementation of the Tax Cut and Jobs Act means that everyone’s tax situation has changed in 2018. With seven new income tax brackets, many people, making the same income in 2018 that they did in 2017, will find themselves in a lower tax bracket. This means more money in their paychecks in 2018 compared with 2017. The new tax law also increased the standard deductions across the board and eliminated miscellaneous itemized deductions.

So what does this mean to you?

The amount you will owe in federal income tax, the deductions you will be able to take, and the amount that should be withheld from your paycheck will have all likely changed.

Finding your “Sweet Spot”

The simplest and most accurate way to determine your appropriate W-4 withholding election is to use the IRS Withholding Calculator, available on the IRS’s website. Keep in mind that this calculator is designed for most taxpayers.

The calculator will ask for your filing status, your family situation, your income, your current withholding, and other information that could affect your 2018 taxes. If the calculator recommends adjusting your withholding, there’s no need to wait! You can adjust your W-4 withholding with your employer at any time, and the change will be reflected in your future paychecks.

Want to learn more?

Of course, this is a general discussion of ensuring accurate W-4 withholdings. If you have additional questions or would like more in-depth information about your withholding, feel free to reach out to me for a free consultation.

 

2018 Commonwealth Financial Network®

Credit Card Dos and Don'ts

The Basics: A credit card is issued by a financial company that gives the holder an option to borrow funds, usually at the point of purchase. Credit cards charge interest and are used primarily for short-term financing. Interest typically begins to be charged one month after a purchase is made, and borrowing limits are pre-set according to an individual’s credit rating.

If you're like me, you probably receive multiple offers weekly from credit card companies seeking new customers with easy to complete applications. In fact, I'd be willing to bet you have one or two sitting in your mailbox right now! These of course are almost always unsolicited. Before you sign on the dotted line and mail in one of those application, you need to know more. Here are some dos and don’ts regarding credit cards.

 
"Do not save what is left after spending, but spend what is left after saving."
                                    - Warren Buffett
 
 

Dos

Shop around. The credit card industry is very competitive, so compare interest rates, credit limits, grace periods, annual fees, terms, and conditions.

Read the fine print. The application is a contract, so read it thoroughly before you sign it. Watch for terms such as “introductory rate,” and be sure you know when that introductory rate of interest expires.

Pay your bill in full each month. Pay off your statement each month in full and on time; otherwise, you will begin paying interest charges and may be charged late fees. Paying off your bill each month can also help ensure that you stay out of debt.

Track your spending. Look closely at your credit card statements each month to be sure that you actually approved the charges that appear. Mistakes can happen, and you don’t want to pay more than you agreed to.

Pay attention to changes in your credit agreement. Occasionally, the credit card company will send you updates on the contract you have with it. If you don’t pay attention, you could miss something important.

 
 

Don’ts

Don’t spend money you don’t have. Buying things without the money in your savings account can lead you down a dangerous path. Before you know it, you could be in a lot of debt with no way to pay it off.

Stay below your maximum credit limit. Creditors want to see that you know how to use your card wisely. Keeping your balance low and making payments in full are good ways to do that. Just because the option to spend more is there doesn’t mean that you should take advantage of it.

Don’t sign up for store credit cards just to receive a discount. Opening a credit line at a store to obtain a discount on a purchase then and there may not be a good idea. Remember that credit cards affect your credit score and that opening too many can actually hurt it. Plus, store credit cards tend to have much higher interest rates than those offered by financial institutions.

Don’t apply for additional credit cards if you have balances on others. Pay your balances on existing cards before you open new accounts. Getting in this habit will make you less likely to open too many accounts.

Don’t give your credit card to someone else. Whether you authorize it or not, giving your credit card to someone else to use is against the law.

 

Although having a credit card is important in helping you to establish a credit history, they are often misused. A credit card can be a powerful tool in the hands of a responsible individual, but it can be even more powerful in a destructive way in the hands of someone who is unaware of its pitfalls. Keep these tips in mind before obtaining and using a credit card.

Building Your Budget: Start With The Basics

A budget is an estimate of income and expenses for a set period of time. Creating a budget can help you get control of your finances and achieve important financial goals, including buying a car, saving for college, purchasing a home, and providing for a family. It can also be beneficial in meeting unexpected financial challenges, such as losing a job. Honestly I know this doesn't sound fun or exciting, but budgeting will help you improve every aspect of your financial life, and the earlier you begin, the better off you’ll be.

Write down your financial goals.

Before you start evaluating how much you can actually save each month to achieve your important goals, you should consider setting some near-term financial goals. This is essential to tracking your progress. So you need to:

 

· Determine what percentage of your paycheck you would like to save.

· Decide how much money you would like to save each month or how much money you need to save in order to achieve one of your longer-term financial goals.

· Consider how much money you want to allocate to future purchases, as well as how much you want to contribute to an emergency fund and a retirement plan.

 

Whether your goal is to put away a couple of hundred—or a few thousand—dollars every year, you need to know what that amount is. Once you have a realistic idea regarding how much you’d like to save, review the steps below, which can help you determine precisely how much you actually can save.

Next Steps

 

1. Track your income for a month. Figure out how much you make per month. Think in terms of your net income, that is, the amount of money you actually take home (i.e., your net pay) after federal, state and local taxes; contributions to employer-sponsored health insurance; and so forth have been subtracted from your gross pay.

2. Track your expenses for a month. This is the most important step to budget creation. You should record every purchase you make—without exception. No dollar should escape accountability. If you bank online, it is extremely easy to track noncash expenses and debit card charges by simply exporting the information from your user login to a spreadsheet.  

3. Create spending categories. Split your expenses into luxury items and necessities. Necessities would include rent, groceries, car payments, insurance, utilities, and so on. Luxuries would include dining out, entertainment, and other unnecessary items (e.g., extra trips to Starbucks).

To be safe, you should include your saving goal as a necessary item, so you would be less likely to sacrifice saving for other luxuries. Excel is a wonderful tool for this because you can color code your expenses, making it more obvious to tell which type of expense is which.

4. Evaluate your budget. This is the final step in budget preparation. Take a good look at your expenses. Do you see numerous luxury items that you can live without? One benefit to having expenses displayed on an electronic spreadsheet is the ability to make quick and easy calculations. You can set limits on your spending based on the results of your calculations. 

 

Besides preparing yourself for big purchases later in life, your budget can help save you from going into debt in the event of an emergency that requires you to unexpectedly spend a large amount of money.

Check your budget frequently

Keep in mind that it’s important to check your budget frequently to be aware of any changes that may have occurred in your financial situation. Every three months is a good rule of thumb for tracking your spending habits. Not doing so could result in overspending, under saving, and therefore delaying your big financial goals.

What are you waiting for? Get started now!

Now that you know how valuable a budget can be to your financial future and achieving your dreams, what are you waiting for? No doubt you’ll want to begin a savings program as soon as possible. Begin by considering the steps outlined here. Our Wealth Wise Plan program would provide you with personalized financial portal to help you track, monitor and improve your budget and cash flow situation. Contact Us today!

Should You Consolidate Your Retirement Accounts?

If you’re like many of the young professionals I work with every day, myself included, you’ve probably had a few different jobs at this point in your career. In many cases you may have started saving for retirement using the available employer plan or even an individual retirement account (IRA). As you change jobs, it may make sense to consolidate all of your savings into one account to achieve a coordinated investment plan.

Why consolidate?

Consolidating your retirement accounts offers several potential benefits:

 

Less administrative hassle. You’ll receive just one account statement, making it easier to keep track of your funds. Consolidating your accounts also simplifies required minimum distribution calculations and tracking. You’d be surprised how often we discover clients have additional accounts they forgot they even had.

No overlap. If you have multiple accounts, that doesn’t necessarily mean that your investments are properly diversified. In fact, your money may be invested in similar asset classes with significant overlap. Consolidating your retirement accounts gives you a clearer view of your asset allocation picture, as well as any adjustments you may need to make.

Easier rebalancing. Any retirement savings account requires periodic rebalancing to keep it in line with your objectives. By consolidating your accounts, you’re more likely to achieve a cohesive investment strategy.

Proper Beneficiary Management. I can’t tell you how often we see clients with multiple IRAs and 401k plans, all with different beneficiary designations. Even more shocking is how often that information is incorrect or outdated. Consolidation makes it much easier to keep these up to date and accurate.

 

How to consolidate

Moving a retirement account to a new employer plan or to an IRA can be done via direct rollover or trustee-to-trustee transfer.

With a trustee-to-trustee transfer, the funds are sent directly from one plan to another. The plan administrator will make the check payable to your new IRA custodian (never to you directly). That is why this type of transfer is often referred to as a direct rollover. Unlike regular rollovers, there is no tax withholding requirement for this type of transaction. When requesting a transfer from your employer’s plan or another retirement account, be sure to use the right terms to avoid unwanted tax consequences. If you’re unsure, contact your financial planner for assistance.

Should you move your employer plan to an IRA?

A former employer will generally let you keep your money in its retirement plan for as long as you want. You may also choose to move those savings to an IRA. Before making the switch to an IRA, however, it’s wise to consider the following factors:

 

Investment choices. An employer’s 401(k) plan may be lower cost, but your choice of investments will be limited, as 401(k) plan sponsors tend to simplify the investment decision for employees by reducing the number of options. With an IRA, you have a potentially unlimited choice of investments, including individual stocks, mutual funds, and alternative investments rarely offered by employer plans.

Control over distributions. Another benefit of IRAs is that you have more control over when your retirement savings are paid to you. Distribution requirements vary among IRA providers, so be sure to understand the choices available to you and your beneficiaries.

Creditor protection. If creditor protection is a concern, both employer plans and IRAs safeguard your retirement savings from creditors to a certain extent. Employer plans generally offer better protection than IRAs do, however. The level of protection an IRA offers depends on your state laws.

Early withdrawal. One reason to keep funds in an employer account, at least temporarily, is that you may need to tap into your retirement savings before you reach age 59½. There is no tax penalty for taking a distribution from your former employer’s plan after you reach age 55. Although you’ll still pay income taxes, you will avoid the 10-percent penalty for early withdrawal, which would be assessed if you withdrew funds from an IRA before age 59½. Exceptions to the penalty on early IRA distributions include:

 
 
  • Unreimbursed medical expenses that amount to more than 10 percent of your adjusted gross income
  • Disability
  • Distributions from a beneficiary IRA upon the death of the original IRA owner
  • Qualified higher-education expenses
  • Qualified first-time home purchase
  • Distributions under a “substantially equal payment” plan, per Section 72(t) of the Internal Revenue Code
 

A Retirement Strategy That Works For You

As you can see there are some great benefits to consolidating your retirement accounts, however, there are many factors that should be considered. I recommend working with a financial planner to determine what is right for you. Please feel free to reach out to me if you have questions. I'd rather develop the best strategy for you and help you implement it properly, than you potentially creating issues trying to do it yourself.

Is a 529 the Best Way to Save for College?

For parents with aspirations of sending their children to college, the costs associated with doing so can be daunting. For decades, the price of higher education has risen at a rate close to three times that of the Consumer Price Index. And although the rate of increase recently has subsided to some degree, this expense continues to be among the most significant faced by parents. 

Let's consider the following statistics:

 
  • According to Trends in College Pricing 2017 produced by The College Board, a nonprofit organization serving students and schools, the average published tuition and fees for in-state students at public four-year colleges and universities for 2017–2018 are $20,770.
  • In addition, the study states that the average published tuition and fees at private four-year colleges and universities for 2017–2018 are $46,950.
 

There is no question that the pursuit of higher education will come at a substantial cost.  You may be searching for the best way to save for that moment when your child leaves home and the bills roll in. To celebrate National 529 Day, let's take a closer look at 529 plans and their effectiveness when it comes to saving for college.

What is a 529 plan anyway?

Excellent question and probably a great place to start! A 529 plan is a qualified tuition savings program listed in section 529 of the Internal Revenue Code. While these plans are governed by federal law, the 529 plan itself is sponsored by the individual state and managed by a mutual fund company that provides the underlying investment choices for the plan. If the state savings plan meets the federal requirements, the plan’s balance and the future distributions from the plan receive favorable tax treatment.

Income tax benefits

A 529 plan provides some very nice tax benefits, with the primary benefit found in the tax treatment of contributions, earnings, and distributions. Contributions to a 529 plan are typically invested in a mixture of stock and bond mutual funds. Similar to an IRA, the earnings on the contributions are tax deferred; however, unlike a traditional IRA, distributions from the 529 plan are tax free, as long as they are used to pay for qualified higher education expenses.

Qualified higher education expenses are defined as expenses incurred for the enrollment and attendance of a full- or part-time student at an eligible educational institution. Common qualifying expenses for both full- and part-time students include tuition, books, supplies, and associated fees.  For a detailed list of what is included, visit www.savingforcollege.com

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 includes an expansion of 529 savings plans that allows families to save for K−12 expenses as well as college expenses. 529 plans will be able to use qualified distributions of up to $10,000 per year, per student, for elementary and secondary school expenses.

The effect on financial aid

529 plans not only provide substantial income, gift, and estate tax savings, but they also often have minimal effects on financial aid. 529 plans owned by parents are considered parental assets; this means they are assessed at a rate of 5.64 percent when determining how much a family is expected to contribute to tuition costs. Plans owned by students are considered student assets; student assets are assessed at a much higher rate of 20 percent. Qualifying distributions from 529 plans also receive advantageous treatment when determining eligibility for the subsequent year of financial aid. 

A wise choice

When considering all of the options available to parents, a 529 plan offers the most beneficial means to save for college. Tax deferral on the growth of underlying investments, tax-free withdrawals for qualifying higher education expenses, the possibility of a state income tax deduction, the low impact on eligibility for financial aid, and the gift and estate tax benefits make a 529 plan an excellent vehicle for saving toward higher education goals.

If you'd like to discuss what makes the most sense for you, please don't hesitate to give us a call. 

 

The fees, expenses and features of 529 plans can vary from state to state. 529 plans involve investment risk, including the possible loss of funds. There is no guarantee that a college-funding goal will be met. The earnings portion of a nonqualified withdrawal will be subject to ordinary income tax at the recipient’s marginal rate and subject to a 10% penalty. By investing in a plan outside of your state residence, you may lose any state tax benefits. 529 plans are subject to enrollment, maintenance and administrative/management fees and expenses.

Emergency Fund: Preparing For The Unexpected

You’ve probably heard how important it is to establish and maintain an emergency fund. Unfortunately, most people don’t fully realize how important this is until a financial emergency strikes. Are you financially prepared for a leaky roof? How about a broken-down car? If you lost your job, how long would you be able to support yourself and your family until you got a new one? 

An emergency fund is money that you’ve set aside to be used in these critical situations, whether its to handle a minor home repair or to pay for something more serious, like medical bills. Despite the importance of having an emergency fund, however, more than three in five Americans have accumulated no savings for unforeseen expenses, according to a recent Bankrate report.

So what do you do? 

Set a goal

How much you need to save depends on a variety of factors. Generally speaking, your emergency fund should cover three to six months of living expenses. I always tell clients to start with three months and aim to work your way up to six months. There are plenty of free online tools that can help you figure out how much you should have on hand.

Keep your funds accessible

It’s important to pick a bank and a savings vehicle that will give you easy access to your emergency fund when you need it. Consider keeping a portion of your money in a regular savings account, as it will provide some return and you’ll be able to withdraw it at any time without penalty. Online banks such as Ally Bank offer significantly higher interest rates when compared to your local banks. For longer-term funding, you might want to use a savings vehicle with higher interest, such as a certificate of deposit (CD) or multiple CDs.  

Avoid savings pitfalls

Naturally, there may be obstacles to overcome as you build your emergency fund. Take a look at some of the most common pitfalls and ways to avoid them:

 

Using your credit card as an emergency fund.

Although credit cards may be convenient, there is a lot to consider before turning to plastic. Using your credit card will likely resolve the immediate need, but when you think about interest on the debt and possible penalties, it may not be worth it in the long run. 

Cheating other accounts to fund your emergency stash.

Withdrawing money allocated to other resources, particularly your retirement savings account, can do long-term damage to your financial picture. If you borrow from your retirement account and default on the loan, you could face serious tax implications and penalties. Think of it this way: taking cash out of your retirement account is like stealing from your future self.

Thinking that you can’t afford it.

The most common excuse for not maintaining an emergency fund is that you don’t make enough money to save. Although your budget may be tight, you don’t need to put away hundreds or thousands of dollars all at once. Starting small works just as well. You might try making your morning coffee at home instead of buying it or bringing your lunch to work instead of going out. The savings may not be dramatic initially, but it will add up.

 

Start today!

Establish your savings goal, figure out how much money you need to put away every month, and stick to the plan. Remember: it’s better to have an emergency fund and never use it than to face hard times with no means to support yourself and your family! If you have questions or want help, please don't hesitate to send me a message.

 
"It's not how much money you make, it's how you save it"
                                            -Anonymous
 

8 Life Events that Require Financial Guidance

Almost everyone stresses over the daily obligations of financial planning, but many also neglect the significant life stages that require special attention and strategies. Here are 8 key life events that could benefit from professional financial guidance.

1. Graduating from College

College graduation marks the first major transition into adulthood. The progression from school to career is a significant milestone and the perfect time to get financial advice. Whether you or a loved one has graduated, this is also a great time to assess needs such as college debt repayment, savings strategies, or insurance.

Luckily, most recent graduates have time on their side. With the decades ahead and the power of compound interest, it’s the perfect time to have a discussion about the benefits of saving right now. The financial foundation built now will have a major impact on the rest of your financial life.

2. Marriage or Divorce

Professional finance advice is extremely beneficial at the time of marriage. Goals such as combining finances, handling credit issues or debt problems, and building a successful financial life with your spouse will be hard to establish without objective financial advice. Click here to download our helpful checklist for newlyweds.

On the other end of the spectrum, divorcees should ensure that they protect their finances. If you’re entering divorce proceedings, important tasks like updating your will, changing your insurance policies, and protecting your investment accounts need to be handled with care and are best managed by a professional.

3. Adding a Member to Your Household

The birth of a child is a miraculous event, but that new addition will bring huge financial and lifestyle changes. College funds will need to be created, wills and insurance policies need to be updated, and a whole host of new expenses will need to be managed. Make sure that your new bundle of joy is off to the best start possible by bringing in a professional.

4. Job and Income Changes

Whether you are starting a new job, changing careers, or accepting a well-deserved promotion, there are important financial considerations to address. During a job change, you’re better off with a financial planning professional who can help you minimize taxes by rolling over retirement accounts and making the most of your stock options. A professional can also help you adjust your financial plan so you start putting more money aside and preparing for a future of continued financial growth.

5. Buying and Selling Property

If you’re buying a home, a professional can help you review your situation in an effort to maximize your tax benefits, deal with capital gains exclusions and taxes, and find write-offs and deductions you might otherwise have missed. Buying and selling property is complicated, and it’s not worth tackling on your own.

6. Illness or Hospitalization

An unexpected illness or hospitalization can strike at any time, and when it does, your finances are soon to be impacted. If you find yourself hospitalized or stricken by a sudden illness, reaching out to a professional could minimize the financial impact and help you recover more quickly. A financial advisor will also help with long-term care options and disability insurance, estate planning, life insurance, and a host of other planning topics that will have an impact on your overall portfolio.

7. Inheriting Property

Dealing with an inheritance can also be complicated, hence why it made our list. If your inheritance comes in the form of a lump sum, it is important that you minimize the tax bite and address outstanding debts. If you are inheriting a retirement account like a 401(k) or IRA, you’ll definitely benefit from assistance with rollover options and investment advice.

8. Retirement

Retirement may be the most important transition in your life. From maximizing and managing benefits to developing a distribution strategy, the right professional can be an invaluable resource.

Everyone wants to feel comfortable by establishing long-term financial security, so it’s worth taking an honest look at your current financial situation and goals. Every day we take the complexity out of financial planning for our clients. We can make it simple for you too, so don't hesitate to contact us directly if you need someone to look over things with you.

Should You React To Stock Market Volatility

The best answer is "No", but that’s not always the easiest.

As you know the markets started 2018 with the wind in their sails, and we all watched as indexes continued their nearly straight-up trajectory from 2017.

Then, after the S&P 500’s best January performance since 1997, stocks took a dive at the beginning of February. On Monday, February 5, the Dow and S&P 500 each lost more than 4%, and the NASDAQ’s drop was nearly as significant. The next day, all 3 indexes posted positive returns.

I understand how unnerving these fluctuations can feel—especially as headlines shout fear-inducing statistics. My goal is to help you better understand where the markets stand today and how to apply this knowledge to your own financial life. 

Putting Performance Into Perspective

When markets post dramatic losses, many people wonder what causes the turbulence—and may assume negative financial data is to blame. However, that wasn’t the case with the recent selloff. 

No negative economic update or geopolitical drama emerged to spur the selloff. Instead, emotion-driven investing may have combined with computer-generated trading to fuel the decline.

While concerns about inflation and interest rates may be to blame for the market fluctuations, it may not be the only detail to focus on. Another key point is important to remember as an investor: Volatility is normal.

Volatility Facts

 

Average Intra-Year Declines: Since 1980, the S&P 500 has experienced an average correction each year of approximately 14%. But in 2017, the markets were unusually calm, fluctuating only 3%. Before this recent decline, the S&P had gone more than 400 days without losing over 5%—its longest span since the 1950s.

Takeaway: Markets fluctuate, and the recent lack of volatility is what’s truly unusual.

Percentages vs. Points: Many news articles mention that the Dow’s 1175-point drop on February 6 was its highest decline in history. While this statement may be true, it leaves out a key detail: The higher an index goes, the smaller a percentage of its total that each point represents. In other words, 1175 points doesn’t have the same impact at 25,000 that it does at 10,000.

Takeaway: Focus on percentages not points to gain a clearer view of market performance.

Recovery From Bad Days: The S&P 500 fell 4.1% on February 5, but within one day, the index regained 1.7%. This performance surpasses historical data. If you analyze the S&P 500’s 15 worst days—where the index lost an average of 8.16%—stocks were still in negative territory 1 day later. But, in 13 instances, stocks were back up within a year by about 21%; they were always in positive territory 5 years later.

Takeaway: Even when stocks lose more ground than they just did, they recover and positive performance returns.

 

Remembering The Last Market Correction

In August 2011, the S&P 500 lost 6.66% in one day. At that time, the European debt crisis was in full swing, the U.S. had lost its AAA credit rating, and the financial sector was reeling.

Facing that situation, impulses to leave the market and avoid further losses could have arisen. As is so often the case, however, staying invested paid off.

Only a year later, the S&P 500 had gained over 25%.

Knowing Where to Go From Here

Over short periods of time, the market trades on fear, anxiety, greed, and emotion. Over the long term, however, economic fundamentals drive the markets. The reality is that equities don’t move in a straight line. Even if volatility is here to stay, we know that price changes can provide new market opportunities.

I encourage you to focus on your long-term goals, rather than short-term fluctuations. Don’t allow emotions to derail your plans. You should feel comfortable in your financial journey. If you don’t have a financial plan in place – please feel free to contact me and I’d be happy to help you get started.